“Tell them we met on Tinder” and other 2014 internet short stories

We love infographics, Buzzfeed lists and the Daily Mail. In secret.

“This is because we are ‘visually wired’,” says NeoMam’s 13 Reasons Why Your Brain Craves Infographics

While we’d all like to be able to go home and digest Tolstoy on a Monday night to widen our literary horizons, more often than not we find ourselves trawling the latest web posts in small, bite-sized chunks.

And it’s a clear trend. The popular ‘What Happens in an Internet Minute’ infographic which we talked about last year during Blogvent and others like it show the huge jump in small data services.

American cloud-based data company DOMO published their own version of the internet minute infographic in 2011 showing similar statistics, their recent update shows how vastly different our internet usage has become in just a few short years.

In 2011, Vines and Tinder didn’t exist (founded June 2012 and September 2012 respectively), but the two now make up over 8,333 videos shared and a massive 416,667 swipes of dating fate per minute.

Data Never Sleeps 2.0, when compared to the original, also shows the astronomical rise of Instagram usage from just 3,600 new photos every minute through to 216,000 in the current digital age.

Instagram wasn’t even available on Android devices until April 2012 and was the hipster domain of Apple users for a full 18 months before developers made it almostuniversally available. It was actually another eighteen months before Windows Phone users were able to join in as recently as November last year.

These three apps are all successfully based around our short attention spans, visual hunger and quick gesture movements.

As we double tap, swipe left or right and loop our way around the internet, other shocking rises in internet use include double the amount of Google queries every minute to 4,000,000, over double the amount of Tweets sent to 277,000 and almost four times the amount of content shared on Facebook to 2,460,000, all this with only an increase of 300 million internet users to a total global internet population of 2.4 billion people.

Since that increase in users can’t account for the whacking great increase in those statistics, all of us are clearly posting and sharing more than ever before which means for me at least, Tolstoy takes an unfortunate backseat.

 

Follow Sine Qua Non’s resident New Zealander, Sarah Byles, on Twitter here or tell us how your internet usage has changed by tweeting @TechandSport.